Tiger Catwalk

Join one of MYCAT‘s tiger CATwalks, which normally take place over a weekend from Friday evening until Sunday evening. These short jungle trips are intended to deter poachers and enhance protection in a key tiger landscape, bordering the national park Taman Negara. You will be in the company of an experienced MYCAT guide and your presence will contribute, physically and financially, to this flagship tiger conservation project.

Itinerary

Day 1: Kuala Lumpur to Merapo
Transfer from Kuala Lumpur to Merapo, on the South Western edge of the Taman Negara national Park in Pahang. The journey is about 3 1/2 hours by road. Your accommodation will be in a basic hotel in the nearby town of Gua Musang, where you will be briefed about the tiger conservation project and introduced to essential jungle skills and kit to ensure your safety in the rainforest.

Day 2: Merapo CATwalk
Your half day jungle trek (4-5 hours) will be under the guidance of an experienced MYCAT guide, who can explain about the illegal poaching and tiger conservation work in this vital corridor linking the two largest tiger landscapes in peninsular Malaysia. The walk is of moderate difficulty and may involve crossing some of the many rainforest streams. You will have a chance to freshen up after your jungle adventure, before an evening group dinner in one of the local restaurants.

Day 3: Batek encounter + return to Kuala Lumpur
The Batek is an aboriginal tribe, who have lived and hunted in this part of the rainforest for centuries, but whose traditional existence is as threatened as the endangered tigers. You can observe their hunting and gathering lifestyle by joining a group of Batek women who will be your guides on a foraging trip in the forest. This is a one-of-a-kind experience, lasting about 4 hours. Afterwards, there will be a chance to freshen up and then it will be time to pack your bag and return to Kuala Lumpur.

To learn more about all the threats facing the Malayan tiger and the local wildlife in general, this half hour documentary ‘Tracks in a Tiger Economy’ provides valuable insight