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Cambridge Marketing Intern 2018

Warm welcome to our Cambridge Marketing Intern 2018

A warm welcome to Lucy who has just started her role as Cambridge Marketing Intern 2018. Lucy is a Biology graduate from Nottingham University. She has already been working in Sales and Marketing, especially events and social media management. For the…

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Do I need a University Degree to work in Conservation?

Traditionally, it has been true that the route to a job in conservation was via a university degree in Life Sciences, such as Biology, Botany, (Marine) Ecology and Zoology. Over the decades, the number of degree subjects has expanded to include interdisciplinary courses ranging from environmental management to conservation biology and sustainable development. Worldwide, there is now a huge number of undergraduate and Master’s courses on offer involving environmental stewardship and sustainability, as this blog post indicates. Academics have observed that there is a generational shift towards a new type of sustainability scholar with a more holistic view than the older scientists.

person-apple-laptop-notebook The growth of university degrees in conservation, especially in developing countries for example in Asia, is a positive trend. However, for many students the cost of a university education has increased even more, so they wonder whether it is worth making such an investment in a university degree? This is a valid question given the current competitive job market all over the world. The answer is tricky and almost always goes “it depends..”. The latter means it is not just a matter of finances, but also what career path you would like to follow, based on your own interests, and at what level.      pexels-photo-203237

Our advice, for those who are genuinely interested in working in conservation, is to educate yourself about the diverse career paths from an early age. This can be through school clubs or local projects, and especially by talking to people who already work in conservation. In this career guide, we have identified seven broad directions, ranging from fieldwork to NGO jobs to media-careers. Many of these opportunities do require a degree, however there are certainly exceptions, and we will highlight these with real-life examples throughout the guide.

The bottom-line remains that a university degree certainly helps when applying for jobs, but employers also look for work experience and skills. This is where volunteering can be very useful, but make sure to select high-quality projects that can provide plenty of such relevant experience and skills. If studying at Uni is not for you, then there are certainly new options that are based on vocational training and work experience.

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What is the right conservation career for me? [with free personality tests]

How to decide what is the right conservation career

right conservation career

‘What’s the right conservation career for me?’ is a question we’re commonly asked. Nature conservation is a diverse and expanding field, but there’s one common thread for all practitioners: an absolute passion for nature and its wildlife.

Apart from this closeness to nature, there are only a few other general traits, as there really is no definitive list of competencies for conservation professionals. Certainly, good communications skills to facilitate team work or engage different audiences are needed, as conservation is just as much about driving behaviour change as it is about wildlife management. Finally, perseverance is a much-needed attribute, in your job search and throughout your career, as it can feel like fighting a losing battle sometimes. 

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HOW TO START A CONSERVATION CAREER

Chris

We want to share with you what we’ve learnt about conservation career paths. ‘What are the different types of conservation?’ and ‘How do you become a wildlife conservationist?’ are some of the most commonly asked questions from aspiring conservationists who volunteer on our conservation and community programs. Chances are, you’re asking similar questions, so here’s our shot at giving some advice:

Wildlife Conservation as a career is consistently growing

If someone says the words ‘conservation career’, most people picture a practical conservationist or ecologist out in the field. Field work and ecology are still going strong, but there are now other sectors that are expanding. Here are just some of the other career paths that conservationists take…

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